CoVAA

Self-Directed and Engaged Learners Through Collaborative Video Annotations

  • Nurtures self-directed learners who can engage critically and deeply with key learning concepts through collaborative knowledge construction

  • Enhances effective design of video-based learning by enabling teachers to:

    • Choose and upload video learning resources

    • Scaffold students’ learning with questions at critical timepoints

    • Observe classroom pattern of engagement through real-time digital formative feedback via teacher and learning dashboards (see Image 1: Timepoint-Based Video Annotation and Interactive Chat Board)

    • Evaluate students’ understanding of key concepts through their timepoint-based video annotations

CoVAA

Image 1: Timepoint-Based Video Annotation and Interactive Chat Board (view larger image )

Collaborative Video-Based Annotation and Analytics (CoVAA) provides both students and teachers a platform for student-centered collaborative learning. CoVAA’s video annotation and peer-to-peer comment features allow students and teachers to work on learning tasks together. Through the platform, students build upon their own and each other’s ideas and understanding (see infographic 1: Benefits of CoVAA) to co-construct knowledge.

Benefits-of-CoVAA

Infographic 1: Benefits of CoVAA (view larger image)

Successfully trialled in 2 secondary schools across 3 subjects, students who used CoVAA:
  • Demonstrated deeper conceptual knowledge of the topics learnt

  • Reported higher levels of creativity and confidence in the subjects

  • Reported that the web-based platform provided a more engaging and individualized learning experience compared to the traditional classroom curriculum

CoVAA is a web-based platform that supports a structured visible and collaborative learning environment within and beyond classroom learning hours by allowing teachers to:


  • Upload videos with annotations at selected timings

  • Post scaffolding questions

  • Showcase students’ annotations on-screen

  • Practise blended multimodal teaching

  • Download student annotations to consolidate learning


Students can also use CoVAA to:

  • View and respond to teachers’ scaffolding questions

  • Engage in perspective-taking

  • Activate metacognitive frames for deeper discussion

  • View and respond to peers’ annotations, comments and replies



Learning analytics

The learning activities data provided on the teacher dashboard (see Image 2: CoVAA Teacher Dashboard) allow teachers to monitor students’ level of engagement. Prepared with the right set of information, teachers can design appropriate action plans to optimize learning.

teacher_Dashboard

Image 2: CoVAA Teacher Dashboard (view larger image)

learning_dashboard1

Image 3: Student Learning Dashboard: My CoVAA Learning Profile (view larger image)

learning_dashboard2

Image 4: Student Learning Dashboard: My 21CC Profile (view larger image)

Students use the formative feedback derived from their learning dashboard (see Image 3: Student Learning Dashboard: My CoVAA Learning Profile and Image 4: Student Learning Dashboard: My 21CC Profile) for reflection and goal-setting.


Critical lenses and talk types

When commenting and annotating in CoVAA, students choose one critical lens and one talk type to tag their responses and annotations. The critical lenses and talk types serve as metacognitive frames for students to help them organise and deepen their thinking.

How did students respond?
  • Students who used CoVAA had significantly better conceptual understanding than those who did not. Across all three subjects, CoVAA deepened students’ conceptual knowledge.

  • By engaging in critical discussion and forming knowledge collaboratively, students became active learners. In this way, the online platform enhanced creative thinking and self-confidence in students.

  • Shy students could share their views more easily in CoVAA. Thus, it fosters a more engaged community of collaborative learners.



In addition, teachers who participated in the research noted:


  • CoVAA provides a consolidated “one-stop” space for efficient viewing of all students’ annotations and discussion comments in real-time (and post-hoc), so that timely prompting, clarification, comparison and explanation can be provided to the whole class.

  • The platform also gives teachers timely information on where students are at, allowing for personalised and timely feedback to correct misconceptions.

  • Quieter students became more active participants, allowing teachers to engage with them more.


With the CoVAA web-based tool


If you are interested to use CoVAA with your students, contact Principal Investigator Dr Jennifer Tan.


Without the CoVAA web-based tool


If accessing CoVAA is not viable for you, you could still apply the CoVAA design framework in your teaching and learning. We have created a Teacher Sample Lesson Design to give a guided example on how you can scaffold video learning materials in your lesson design. This sample was created for a Secondary 3 Social Studies class.



  • Risko, E. F., Foulsham, T., Dawson, S., & Kingstone, A. (2013). The Collaborative Lecture Annotation System (CLAS): A New TOOL for Distributed Learning. IEEE Transactions On Learning Technologies, 6(1), 4-13.

  • Pena-Shaff, J. B., & Nicholls, C. (2004). Analyzing Student Interactions and Meaning Construction in Computer Bulletin Board Discussions. Computers And Education, 42(3), 243-265.

  • Research led by
    Author
    Principal Investigator
    Dr Jennifer Tan
    Author
    Co-Principal Investigator
    Dr Elizabeth Koh
    Author
    Co-Principal Investigator
    Dr Imelda Caleon

    To learn more, email: jen.tan@nie.edu.sg

      Collaborators
    • Ms Tay Siu Hua, MOE

    • Ms Chan Hwee Leng, HOD Humanities, AHS, MOE

    • Ms Agnes Lim, HOD Science, CSS, MOE

      Research Assistants
    • Ms Christin Jonathan, NIE
    • Ms Nadia Suzuki, NIE
      Software Engineers
    • Ms Shi Hui Kok, NIE
    • Mr Simon Yang, NIE
    What students say

    “Makes us think and 'use our brain' as we answer the questions instead of just plain listening. Helps in our thinking process as we put our thoughts into words.”

    - Student

    “I [can] view my classmates' responses, to see and compare how my answers differ from theirs, [which] therefore engages me in critical thinking to see different perspectives.”

    - Student
    Phase of education

    Secondary school

    Academic subject

    Science

    Social Studies

    Geography

    Research Participants

    m-prose-icon 696 students

    m-prose-icon 22 HOD, 12 teachers

    m-prose-icon 2 secondary schools

    Themes

    Nil

    Topics

    Learning Analytics, 21st Century Competencies, Critical Thinking, Science, Social Studies, Geography & Humanities

    CoVAA

    Self-Directed and Engaged Learners Through Collaborative Video Annotations

    Question-Icon
    How CoVAA can help your students
    • Nurtures self-directed learners who can engage critically and deeply with key learning concepts through collaborative knowledge construction
    • Enhances effective design of video-based learning by enabling teachers to:
      • Choose and upload video learning resources

      • Scaffold students’ learning with questions at critical timepoints

      • Observe classroom pattern of engagement through real-time digital formative feedback via teacher and learning dashboards (see Image 1: Timepoint-Based Video Annotation and Interactive Chat Board)

      • Evaluate students’ understanding of key concepts through their timepoint-based video annotations

    CoVAA

    Image 1: Timepoint-Based Video Annotation and Interactive Chat Board (view larger image)

    Question-Icon
    Why CoVAA?

    Collaborative Video-Based Annotation and Analytics (CoVAA) provides both students and teachers a platform for student-centered collaborative learning. CoVAA’s video annotation and peer-to-peer comment features allow students and teachers to work on learning tasks together. Through the platform, students build upon their own and each other’s ideas and understanding (see infographic 1: Benefits of CoVAA) to co-construct knowledge.

    Benefits-of-CoVAA

    Infographic 1: Benefits of CoVAA (view larger image)

    Successfully trialled in 2 secondary schools across 3 subjects, students who used CoVAA:


    • Demonstrated deeper conceptual knowledge of the topics learnt
    • Reported higher levels of creativity and confidence in the subjects
    • Reported that the web-based platform provided a more engaging and individualized learning experience compared to the traditional classroom curriculum
    How does it work?

    CoVAA is a web-based platform that supports a structured visible and collaborative learning environment within and beyond classroom learning hours by allowing teachers to:

    • Upload videos with annotations at selected timings
    • Post scaffolding questions
    • Showcase students’ annotations on-screen
    • Practise blended multimodal teaching
    • Download student annotations to consolidate learning

    Students can also use CoVAA to:

    • View and respond to teachers’ scaffolding questions
    • Engage in perspective-taking
    • Activate metacognitive frames for deeper discussion
    • View and respond to peers’ annotations, comments and replies

    Learning analytics

    The learning activities data provided on the teacher dashboard (see Image 2: CoVAA Teacher Dashboard) allow teachers to monitor students’ level of engagement. Prepared with the right set of information, teachers can design appropriate action plans to optimize learning.

    Image 2: CoVAA Teacher Dashboard (view larger image)

    Image 3: Student Learning Dashboard: My CoVAA Learning Profile (view larger image)

    Image 4: Student Learning Dashboard: My 21CC Profile (view larger image)

    Students use the formative feedback derived from their learning dashboard (see Image 3: Student Learning Dashboard: My CoVAA Learning Profile and Image 4: Student Learning Dashboard: My 21CC Profile) for reflection and goal-setting.


    Critical lenses and talk types

    When commenting and annotating in CoVAA, students choose one critical lens and one talk type to tag their responses and annotations. The critical lenses and talk types serve as metacognitive frames for students to help them organise and deepen their thinking.

    Question-Icon
    Key findings
    How did students respond?


    • Students who used CoVAA had significantly better conceptual understanding than those who did not. Across all three subjects, CoVAA deepened students’ conceptual knowledge.
    • By engaging in critical discussion and forming knowledge collaboratively, students became active learners. In this way, the online platform enhanced creative thinking and self-confidence in students.
    • Shy students could share their views more easily in CoVAA. Thus, it fosters a more engaged community of collaborative learners.


    In addition, teachers who participated in the research noted:



    • CoVAA provides a consolidated “one-stop” space for efficient viewing of all students’ annotations and discussion comments in real-time (and post-hoc), so that timely prompting, clarification, comparison and explanation can be provided to the whole class.
    • The platform also gives teachers timely information on where students are at, allowing for personalised and timely feedback to correct misconceptions.
    • Quieter students became more active participants, allowing teachers to engage with them more.


    Question-Icon
    How can teachers get started?

    With the CoVAA web-based tool


    If you are interested to use CoVAA with your students, contact Principal Investigator Dr Jennifer Tan.


    Without the CoVAA web-based tool


    If accessing CoVAA is not viable for you, you could still apply the CoVAA design framework in your teaching and learning. We have created a Teacher Sample Lesson Design to give a guided example on how you can scaffold video learning materials in your lesson design. This sample was created for a Secondary 3 Social Studies class.


    Question-Icon
    Related links
    Question-Icon
    Further readings

  • Risko, E. F., Foulsham, T., Dawson, S., & Kingstone, A. (2013). The Collaborative Lecture Annotation System (CLAS): A New TOOL for Distributed Learning. IEEE Transactions On Learning Technologies, 6(1), 4-13.

  • Pena-Shaff, J. B., & Nicholls, C. (2004). Analyzing Student Interactions and Meaning Construction in Computer Bulletin Board Discussions. Computers And Education, 42(3), 243-265.

  • Question-Icon
    Research team

    To learn more about CoVAA, please contact the Principal Investigator Dr Jennifer Tan at jen.tan@nie.edu.sg.



      Principal Investigator
    • Dr Jennifer Tan, Office of Education Research (OER), NIE
      Co-Principal Investigators
    • Dr Elizabeth Koh, OER, NIE
    • Dr Imelda Caleon, OER, NIE
      Collaborators
    • Ms Tay Siu Hua, MOE
    • Ms Chan Hwee Leng, HOD Humanities, AHS, MOE
    • Ms Agnes Lim, HOD Science, CSS, MOE
      Research Assistants
    • Ms Christin Jonathan, NIE
    • Ms Nadia Suzuki, NIE
      Software Engineers
    • Ms Shi Hui Kok, NIE
    • Mr Simon Yang, NIE

    This research on CoVAA was funded by Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF) under the eduLab Programme (NRF2015-EDU001-IHL09) and administered by National Institute of Education (NIE), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Singapore NRF and NIE.


    This knowledge resource was written by Nadia Suzuki, Bernadine W. Sengalrayan, with contributions from Chen Xiuqi.

    What students say

    “Makes us think and 'use our brain' as we answer the questions instead of just plain listening. Helps in our thinking process as we put our thoughts into words.”

    - Student

    “I [can] view my classmates' responses, to see and compare how my answers differ from theirs, [which] therefore engages me in critical thinking to see different perspectives.”

    - Student
    Phase of education

    Secondary school

    Academic subject

    Science

    Social Studies

    Geography

    Research Participants

    m-prose-icon 696 students

    m-prose-icon 2 HOD, 12 teachers

    m-prose-icon 2 secondary schools

    Themes

    Nil

    Topics

    Learning Analytics, 21st Century Competencies, Critical Thinking, Science, Social Studies, Geography & Humanities